Archive for June, 2009

Jeffrey Jordan Epitomizes a Student Athlete

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009

Last week, Jeffrey Jordan, Juanita and Michael Jordan’s son announced he was going to not play college basketball for the University of Illinois this season so he could concentrate on his studies.

This announcement has so many admirable qualities to it that this post can only highlight a few. First, what a great message to send to the countless student athletes around the globe. Second, and these are in no means in any order of admiration, what character this decision took. Third, what courage this decision took. Fourth, what maturity this displayed.

Certainly the bulk of praise for this decision goes to this fine young man, but I also must acknowledge Juanita (Yes, mom first.) and Michael Jordan for raising a young man under unfathomable scrutiny and instilling these values and characteristics in this young man in spite of all those pressures.

To us professionals in The International Sports Professionals Association this is a wonderful example of what athletics represents and can aspire yet to be in this age of steroids, misplaced values, and dubious characters.

Dr. John E. Mayer

President

International Sports Professionals Association-ISPA

Dr. Mayer In The Wall Street Journal

Friday, June 26th, 2009

Dr. Mayer was recently interviewed for an article in the Wall Street Journal about relationships in professional tennis.

Excerpt taken from The Wall Street Journal: …All athletes wrestle with the distractions of romance in their personal lives, but tennis is one of the few professional sports where players must face love interests and old flames on almost a monthly basis on the courts and in player hotels. Dr. John Mayer, a Chicago-based sports psychologist and president of the International Sports Professionals Association who has worked with two dozen professionals on tour, likens tennis to high school or Hollywood.

Jimmy Connors and Chris Evert

“It’s kind of an incestuous world,” says Dr. Mayer. When it comes to romance, he says, even the most accomplished male players tend to behave like “neanderthals” and female players like “giggly Jonas Brothers fans.” This often results in “very adolescent” relationships, he says, that last an average of three to four months and tend to have noticeable effects on a player’s performance at various stages.

In the seduction or “wooing” period, Dr. Mayer says, performance generally peaks. Canada’s top player, Frank Dancevic, for example, says he achieved the best result of his life the first time he brought his girlfriend to a tournament in Indianapolis two years ago. “I think I was just trying to show off-I didn’t want to look like a wuss,” says Mr. Dancevic.

As relationships progress, however, things can get complicated. Dr. Mayer says he watched one tour relationship hit the skids after the male player repackaged a watch given to him by a major tour sponsor and sent it to his girlfriend, another pro player, fibbing that he’d bought the watch in Paris-not knowing that his girlfriend had received the same watch from the same sponsor.

Click here to read the entire article:   Tennis Gets Hot and Heavy


Summer Hydration= Increased Activity and Increased Heat

Thursday, June 25th, 2009

I thought it may be useful to pass along hydration guidelines as we approach the summer months when many of us are more active and those we coach, train or advise are looking for the best information on fluid intake and the body’s needs.

The following is an excerpt from the soon to be released book: Family Fit (ISPA/NP2 Publishing, 2009) by Dr. John Mayer. With permission from the author and publisher.

Visit Dr. Mayor’s web site www.NogginPower2.com for purchase information.

Water, Water Everywhere

One food mentioned on the preceding chart deserves special attention in our families—water. Water is often neglected in households. It has been consistently shown to be as good a thirst quencher as any sports drink or other beverage. We just do not drink enough water in our diet even though it is vital to our physical well-being. Make sure your family drinks plenty. The average healthy adult should drink the equivalent of about 5-6 glasses of water per day. It is a widely held myth that we should be consuming water according to the 8×8 rule. That is, eight 8 oz glasses of water per day. We don’t require that much water for a variety of reasons. Dr. Heinz Valtin, Professor Emeritus at Dartmouth Medical School and author of many of the most esteemed textbooks on kidney function and water balance has studied the body’s need for water all of his career. His research gives me great confidence to talk about the proper needs for water in the body. (more…)