Posts Tagged ‘NYT’

More on Slow Runners-NYT Article

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

Last week in these blogs we debated the issue of slow runners and whether they should be allowed to compete in marathons. Today, a favorite columnist of mine in the New York Times chimed in with her own story as a slow runner. Tara Parker-Pope gives a very unique and interesting perspective on this debate. She her column at: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/03/health/03well.html?_r=1&ref=science. She presents not only her own personal perspective, but brings in compelling facts and some interesting opinions from surprising sources. Check this out.

Dr. John E. Mayer

“Suck it up” Bad & Dangerous Advice

Thursday, August 27th, 2009

“Suck it Up” is Bad and Dangerous

The traditional coaching axiom after what seems to be a minor injury is not only stupid, it is now being seen by experts as dangerous. We are heading into what some experts consider the ‘head trauma season’ in sports. Coaches, trainers, parents, it is wise to be prepared.

If a player receives an injury, even a minor one, what many coaches call a “dinger” or when the player sees stars or is briefly disorientated, they need to sit. These are mild concussions and not sitting can be dangerous. Last year the New York Times did a series of 15 articles on the results of repeated concussions in players from youth through pros. They found that the long term consequences of repeat concussions were: persistent headaches, fatigue, difficulty paying attention (ADD-like symptoms), memory problems, mood swings and personality changes. In a few cases even death resulted.

Don’t take even ‘minor’ hits lightly. “When in doubt, sit them out.” That is the strong advice of Dr. Robert C. Cantu, one of the leading experts on concussions. (As quoted in the New York Times Aug. 25, 2009) Dr. Cantu is a co-author of the National Athletic Trainers Association position paper on sports-related concussions.

These ‘dings’ to the head do not only come from sports. Parents know that young children bang their heads frequently as they learn how to navigate their world. Take the same advice, make them rest and not exert themselves after a hit to the head, even minor.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President-ISPA