Posts Tagged ‘President-ISPA’

One Fallen Athlete has it right.

Monday, April 26th, 2010

One of those small one paragraph blurbs appeared recently in the New York Times Sports Section (Yes, Virginia, there is a NYT sports section.) The piece mentioned that Olympic and world champion sprinter, LaShawn Merritt has accepted a provisional suspension after testing positive for using an over-the-counter male enhancement product. Merritt admitted the use of the product and stated that he hoped his family would forgive him for a, “foolish, immature and egotistical mistake.”

Let’s praise an athlete who admits to a mistake, identifies the source of his weakness and simply asks for forgiveness. No spin doctors creating ridiculous commercials with deceased parents, so scripted, insincere apologies, just acknowledging a deficit, taking a consequence and being better.

Isn’t that what we train athletes to do within their sport?

Dr. John Mayer, President

ISPA Helps a Start-up

Monday, April 19th, 2010

This is a nice story how we can help our professionals:

In a conversation with an ISPA professional, Rob Fisher, an ex-minor league (USA) baseball player, now coach and soon to be special education teacher and author, he mentioned how a fellow coach and he were going to be starting up a coaching business of their own. He asked my advice on getting started and we had a lengthy conversation. Near the end of our conversation he casually mentioned that, “Geez, I have to get a brochure together and I don’t want to pay a designer, graphic artist and printer. We have so many start-up costs already.” You could hear the stress in his voice.

I interrupted him and let him know that ISPA has a format for a brochure that was professionally done and because he is an ISPA credentialed professional we would be glad to share resources with his new business. His response: “Oh my God, thank you a thousand times, that takes so much pressure off me!”

This is what we do for our professionals, we help build careers. We have so many benefits to being credentialed with ISPA, some of which are are spontaneous and happen organically just like with Rob.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President

Workers’ Compensation Rehabilitation Certification

Tuesday, April 13th, 2010

The ISPA, in conjunction with ATI Physical Therapy, is in the process of finalizing its newly designed Workers’ Compensation Rehabilitation Certification to the world! This Certification has been almost a year in the making and includes an examination that tests on the various areas of knowledge needed to rehabilitate injured workers. This Certification has also been designed to cover many different occupations within the healthcare field! This includes, but is not limited to, Physical Therapists, Athletic Trainers, Personal Trainers, Rehabilitation Specialists, Strength and Conditioning Specialists and Physicians! This landmark certification is the first and only of its kind! The ISPA is very proud of this achievement and is looking forward to its release and impact on the world of healthcare!

For more information, please contact the ISPA at info@theispa.org.

ISPA-Professional Spotlight for April

Thursday, April 1st, 2010

The International Sports Professionals Association is pleased to announce its Credentialed Professional for April is Edgar Tham.

Edgar is Singapore’s pioneer Sport & Performance Psychologist, he has worked with more than 40 different performance domains (e.g., sports, music, performing arts, military, business, trading, etc) from the schools to world championship levels since 1993. He was employed by the Singapore Government as its very first local sport psychologist in 1995.

Edgar was the team consultant and traveling psychologist to numerous national teams preparing for the SEA Games, Asian Games, Commonwealth Games, Olympic Games, Paralympic Games and World Championships since 1993.  As a Registered Psychologist with the Singapore Psychological Society, Edgar is listed in the International Who’s Who of Professionals (2000) for his specialized work in peak performance psychology. He is the author of “In The Zone: The Mindset for Peak Performance in Sports,” “Psychological Rehabilitation: Mental Skills for Healing & Recovery” and co-author of “The Ideal Performance State” with Dr Daniel Weigand, President of Achieve Acumen, Inc, USA.  In 2007, Edgar developed a new high-performance SPORTS Coaching Model for executive coaching in MNC’s and business corporations.

He is long-time lecturer for the Singapore Sports Council’s National Coaching Accreditation Program in Mental Skills Training since 1996, and is a part-time faculty member of several overseas undergraduate psychology and sport science degree courses offered in Singapore.

Congratulations Edgar!

ISPA-Management Team

He is long-time lecturer for the Singapore Sports Council�s National Coaching Accreditation Program in Mental Skills Training since 1996, and is a part-time faculty member of several overseas undergraduate psychology and sport science degree courses offered in Singapore.

It doesn’t take a Rocket Scientist

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

My friends at the New York Times are at it again. In an article titled, “Baby fat may Not Be So Cute After All.” The writer Roni Caryn Rabin reports about research that indicates that our efforts to change the eating habits of children may be starting too late if we begin them in the early school years. Bravo! Exactly! But, then she ponders along with some researchers she interviewed how can we reach children at even younger ages? That’s when Roni goes from high brow NYT science reporter to: duh!

We can reach children at the earliest age by reaching their PARENTS with good habits in eating and activity level. It’s obvious. The whole theme of my latest book, FAMILY FIT, about just that. Family Fit appears on the first page of a Google search, so it wouldn’t take much to uncover the answer, Roni, it’s right there. Change families and you change kids. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to calculate that BMI (Better Motivational Insight).

Dr. John Mayer, President, ISPA

Publish or Perish

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

Many professionals are desperate to find outlets for their publishing needs. I hope you remember that the ISPA has a publishing division that can serve as such an outlet. Whether it is a book or monograph or a CEU course, consider publishing with ISPA/NP2 Publishing and reach a global audience. Details are provided inside the web site.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President

Office First Aid/CPR/Med Emergencies

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

Hello:
I am very excited by the new CEU course ISPA has up on our web site (www.TheSportsProfessionals.com). It is on office procedures for first aid–CPR–medical emergencies. Not only is this course common sense to have for ANYONE’s office, but insurance premiums, accreditation bodies, and other overseers may be satisfied to know you and your staff have taken this course.

The author of the course, Jamie Kirschner received her BSN from Winona State University. While there she did an extensive clerkship at the Mayo Clinic. Currently she is employed as a staff nurse at the University of Chicago Medical Center on an Oncology and Hematology unit. She has six years of experience as a healthcare professional and has been certified in CPR and First Aid throughout the duration of her professional career. Ms. Kirschner has presented at the Annual Conference of Qualitative Inquiry. That research is being prepared for inclusion in a scientific journal. She has also developed educational tools for nursing while at the Mayo Clinic.

Please look into this course very seriously for your benefit and the benefit of those you serve.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President

The Athlete’s Heart

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

A very important way that ISPA professionals and all those involved in sport can help athletes today is to get behind the movement to have athletes heart checked through an ECG as a part of their routine medical exam prior to participation. The benefits are enormous and the only negative that has been brought up is the extra cost involved in adding this to the typical medical exam.

Studies have shown that pre-participation screening of athletes would lower the incidence of sudden cardiac death by 89%. Coincidently, the typical cost of adding an ECG to the screening is $89.

Athletes between the ages of 14 to 35 should get this screening prior to participation. If it is not going to be a mandated part of their physical exam encourage parents and athletes to get an ECG added voluntarily to the athlete’s exam. Let’s get behind this and save lives.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President

Are you Maximizing your Workplace Benefits?

Friday, February 26th, 2010

An idea that we have found very helpful is to suggest that you use your Education Benefits that your employer gives you toward your ISPA credentialing fees. This has been a great idea for many because of the simple math involved. Many companies set aside a small figure in their benefits package for Education, let’s say $200.00. Have you tried to sign up for a graduate course for $200.00? A conference fee? Buy books? Videotapes? But, ISPA credentialing starts at $195.00. Voila!

A presentation you attend is temporary, the investment in your career credentials is longstanding. Think about it.

Dr. Mayer, President

Oprah Comes up Lame

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

This time Oprah is lame, as in ‘Lame Duck.’ That is the only way I can explain how her production company (HARPO) is developing a new show with Nate Berkus. The show’s theme is: “Need help with your teenage daughter? Are you constantly fighting with your daughter? Whether it’s her wardrobe, boys, or her messy room, are you finding it hard to get through to her? Do you wish your daughter would listen to you more and take your advice? Let Nate Berkus help you maneuver through teen drama.” Nate Berkus is an interior designer. Ok, he’s going to tell us how to parent our daughters? Educators, psychologists, counselors, social workers should be furious. Where and when did this guy get his training to solve these problems? Does anyone at HARPO have a conscience? Have they considered the potential harm they could cause by an interior designer giving problem advice? Is Oprah paying attention to these people?

I must admit to a guilty indulgence. I had respected Oprah, even admired her in the past. For every 16 programs that had incestuous hillbillies and 11 of celebrities jumping on couches, she would have 1 or 2 that raised the level of intelligence of the USA. By George, she should be forgiven for that 27:2 ratio just on what she has done for reading in this country. I looked away at Dr. Phil, shuddered as he paraded out his son as an expert on teens based on the boy’s credentials of just having been one, the arrogant Art Smith was/is irksome but I could just avoid those shows, the Wizard of Oz, well he seems to enjoy himself, to hell with everyone else. But, an interior designer giving parenting advice? Is this an extended middle finger to America in the last year of the show? Take this America, it doesn’t take years of training and experience and decades of research to tell you how to care for teen girls, just consult the cutest interior designer you can find. It’s easy. I don’t know how much more of this I can take Oprah.

Isn’t it about time that organizations like the APA, the NASW and NEA spoke out to defend their professions? Isn’t that what we pay dues for? For them to protect our professions and guide the public so they turn to trained people to help with these issues? If such a folly as this invaded medicine, the AMA would shut this nonsense down in a heartbeat-probably right after mini-Phil started spouting out as an expert on teens. Maybe it’s time we all question where our dues goes to these organizations? Are they protecting you and I? ISPA speaks out to defend and build our professional’s careers.

Oprah, don’t be alame (duck) control your people. You only have a few more months, go out in style.

Dr. John Mayer