Posts Tagged ‘sports injuries’

CWcHP #3 News Story of 2010

Friday, January 7th, 2011

According to a recent article published by ADVANCE for Physical Therapy Practitioners┬«, the feature on the Certified Workers’ Compensation Healthcare Provider credential entitled “Should you take the CWcHP Exam” (published on September 20 2010) ranked third on its list of the top 10 news stories of 2010. The article features interviews of ISPA Director of Business Development, Andrew Teunis, and provides a detailed objective overview of the certification’s development, components and the current issues it aims to address.

The original article can be read by clicking here.

If you interested in learning more about the CWcHP Certification, please visit the ISPA website at www.theISPA.org

New Credential off to a Great Start!

Monday, June 14th, 2010

The launch of the new CWcHP certification has been very well received. Physical Therapists and Athletic Trainers are becoming certified to care for the injured worker. Most who have applied for the credential thus far have had their fees paid for through their employee benefit allocation for continuing education and certifications. Thus, this credential is a Win-Win-Win for everyone. It advances the therapist/trainer’s career (Win); it advances the standing of the company they work for (Win); and most of all, it helps the clients (Win).

Please help spread the word on this important certification.

Dr. John Mayer, President

Getting Your Credential Paid For

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

Yesterday ISPA announced the release of the CWcHP certification for physical therapists and athletic trainers to care for Worker’s Compensation Rehabilitation cases. I would like to highlight that several therapists are paying for their credential and examination through their employee benefits package at their place of employment. Check this out….you have usually a yearly benefit for attending conferences, extra training, credentials, etc. This is a win-win for you and your employer.

Dr. Mayer

One Fallen Athlete has it right.

Monday, April 26th, 2010

One of those small one paragraph blurbs appeared recently in the New York Times Sports Section (Yes, Virginia, there is a NYT sports section.) The piece mentioned that Olympic and world champion sprinter, LaShawn Merritt has accepted a provisional suspension after testing positive for using an over-the-counter male enhancement product. Merritt admitted the use of the product and stated that he hoped his family would forgive him for a, “foolish, immature and egotistical mistake.”

Let’s praise an athlete who admits to a mistake, identifies the source of his weakness and simply asks for forgiveness. No spin doctors creating ridiculous commercials with deceased parents, so scripted, insincere apologies, just acknowledging a deficit, taking a consequence and being better.

Isn’t that what we train athletes to do within their sport?

Dr. John Mayer, President

Office First Aid/CPR/Med Emergencies

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

Hello:
I am very excited by the new CEU course ISPA has up on our web site (www.TheSportsProfessionals.com). It is on office procedures for first aid–CPR–medical emergencies. Not only is this course common sense to have for ANYONE’s office, but insurance premiums, accreditation bodies, and other overseers may be satisfied to know you and your staff have taken this course.

The author of the course, Jamie Kirschner received her BSN from Winona State University. While there she did an extensive clerkship at the Mayo Clinic. Currently she is employed as a staff nurse at the University of Chicago Medical Center on an Oncology and Hematology unit. She has six years of experience as a healthcare professional and has been certified in CPR and First Aid throughout the duration of her professional career. Ms. Kirschner has presented at the Annual Conference of Qualitative Inquiry. That research is being prepared for inclusion in a scientific journal. She has also developed educational tools for nursing while at the Mayo Clinic.

Please look into this course very seriously for your benefit and the benefit of those you serve.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President

The Athlete’s Heart

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

A very important way that ISPA professionals and all those involved in sport can help athletes today is to get behind the movement to have athletes heart checked through an ECG as a part of their routine medical exam prior to participation. The benefits are enormous and the only negative that has been brought up is the extra cost involved in adding this to the typical medical exam.

Studies have shown that pre-participation screening of athletes would lower the incidence of sudden cardiac death by 89%. Coincidently, the typical cost of adding an ECG to the screening is $89.

Athletes between the ages of 14 to 35 should get this screening prior to participation. If it is not going to be a mandated part of their physical exam encourage parents and athletes to get an ECG added voluntarily to the athlete’s exam. Let’s get behind this and save lives.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President

ISPA and ATI Physical Therapy

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

We had a great meeting at ATI Physical Therapy at their Carol Stream, IL complex! Talk about beautiful – this complex had absolutely EVERYTHING. Weight training, cardiovascular training, gymnastics training, aquatic training, you name it! ISPA management was meeting with Dr. Chris Stout, and his team, once again to discuss some upcoming projects that will hopefully be made public in the next month or two. We are also working on putting our minds together to put together some online video training. Exciting stuff to say the least! More to come ~

– Andrew Teunis, Director of Business Development ISPA

Super Bowl Deaths

Friday, February 5th, 2010

Special advisory for ISPA professionals to use for their clients and to disseminate in their communities:

You have undoubtedly noticed that I love ┬áthe New York Times. I found another valuable piece of information in that paper in one of my favorite sections, Science Times. In the Feb. 4, 2010 edition of the NYT, reporter Anahad O’Connor wrote about studies that showed the increase in deaths and cardiac emergencies during Super Bowl Sunday. It appears as though the extra stress of this highly emotionally charged event places additional stress on those already at risk for cardiac incidents. Couple this extra stress with the traditional over-indulgence in eating and drinking and you have a recipe for disaster.

I would suggest that the responsible professional urges caution to all their clients and to their communities during this high risk day/weekend. Please pass along the message to those you encounter in your professional practice to exercise caution in their enjoyment of this sporting event. I am treating this weekend as I would the upcoming prom weekends each spring. I am passing along the message to everyone to celebrate and enjoy this event responsibly. Please help spread the word and save lives.

Our mission at ISPA is to help support sports as socially responsible activities.

Dr. John E. Mayer, President

The International Sports Professionals Association-ISPA


Burning Fat in Winter Workouts

Friday, January 29th, 2010

I researched a great tip to pass on to your clients:

The age-old question is, ‘Do we burn more fat exercising outdoors in colder weather or in hotter weather?’ I have heard professionals banter back and forth on this issue for as long as I been a gym rat. During this brutal Midwestern winter I decided to do some research on this and I gave up with the definitive answer. I found the definitive study on this in the journal, Sports Medicine 1991 issue. The study was conducted at the Naval Medical Research Institute. They found that fat metabolism was actually slowed down in cold weather. They hypothesized that the slow down in metabolism could be linked to the constriction of blood vessels in the peripheral fatty tissues when exercise is done in the cold. The study also found interesting results on breathing outside. (Don’t we all feel that are breathing is so much deeper and cleaner when we run in the cold weather?) They found that indeed, upon initial contact with cold weather the volume of air inhaled and exhaled in the first minute is higher but soon after continuing to exercise (run) in the cold it returns to rates comparable to what it is when we exercise (run) in warm weather. (Hmmmmm……) They also found that heart rate is generally lower in cold weather exercise.

This is great information to pass onto clients at all levels when they ask this question of you. Now you have the definitive response and the research to cite. Run with it. (Excuse the pun.)

Dr. John Mayer, President

Marathon-Hay is in the Barn

Saturday, October 31st, 2009

Justin Mayer, Executive Director of ISPA, always would caution me in the days before a race when I was fretting whether I did enough training or not, “The hay is in the barn, not much you can do about it now!” This is a great tip the night before a Marathon.

I always remembered that advice in every race. Which brings me to the night before a race and sleep. This is some advice you are not going to hear from many professionals and I’m going to be radical here. DON’T WORRY ABOUT IT. Like all race preparation, ‘The Hay is in the Barn. If you are tossing and turning tonight. Don’t let that worry you on race day. It is what it is! The most important consideration with regard to sleep is your rest the week before and two nights before the race as well as your rest in recovery the night after your big race. If you are in the starting corral and are worrying about how much sleep you got last night you are not going to be mentally ready to run. Relax, the Hay is in the Barn!

Relax, have fun, enjoy the experience!

Dr. John E. Mayer, President-ISPA